Artist stop Andrew Maize
I am a trans-disciplinary settler [scottish/irish/english] artist who occupies traditional Mi’kma’ki territory [Upper Economy, Nova Scotia]. As an arts educator and organizer, I am involved in collaborative projects such as White Rabbit Arts, the Circus of the Normal and the Lunenburg School of the Arts. I received a BFA Interdisciplinary from NSCAD University in 2011 and have been shortlisted in the RBC Painting Competition in both 2015 and 2016. 9

the truth is that if the sea did not cover these mines twice a day, and if they did not

occur in rocks of such hardness, one might expect something therefrom

 

Every place name is a story, an outcropping of the shared tales that form the bedrock of community - Lucy Lippard, Lure of the Local

 

The title of this site-specific work, a quote from Samuel de Champlain, speaks to the complexity and absurdity of the colonialist practice of resource-based nomenclature that blatantly disregarded the traditional names used by the Mi’Kmaq for thousands of years on their ancestral and unceded territory. I would like to acknowledge that this territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet) people first signed with the British Crown in 1725.

 

Here are some resources I found while doing my research:

As a result of report that copper could be found there, Champlain visited the area

three times, and located some small copper deposits. Although his finds scarcely

merited the name ‘mines’, this name was given to the port [now advocate harbour],

and later, to Baie des Mines. The name also applied to the settlement on it’s

southern shore which became known, quite unjustifiably, as Les Mines (Minas).

Despite the proliferation of mine-related place names, the size of the copper

deposits in the area did not merit commercial exploitation by either the French of

English.

 

The term “mine”, as used by Champlain referred to seams of ore, not to any system of recovering the mineral. Samuel Champlain, who gave the area its name,

observed ‘the truth is that if the sea did not cover these mines twice a day, and if

they did not occur in rocks of such hardness, one might expect something

therefrom’

 

In the quote, Samuel du Champlain is observing the challenges of mining the

resources he named various locations in the region for. Although his finds scarcely

merited the name ‘mines’, this name was given to the port [now advocate harbour],

and later, to Baie des Mines.

 

- Joan Dawson, Mapmaker’s eye : Nova Scotia through early maps

 

Starr's point was called "Nesogwjtk" (eel point) or "Nesoogwitk" (point between two

rivers) by the Mi'kmaq People. The point was settled by Acadians in the late 1600

as part of the Rivière-aux-Canards settlement. It was called Boudreau's Point, after

the Boudreau family who farmed the point. The Boudreaus also operated a ferry

and schooner landing from the north side of the point along the Cornwallis River

called Boudreau's Bank, where a flat bank of sandstone allowed schooners to

safely beach and unload on at low tide. Acadians from the Rivière-aux-Canards

settlement were expelled from this point in the 1755 Bay of Fundy Campaign of the

Expulsion of the Acadians marched to Boudreau's Bank by British troops to be

loaded on deportation ships.

 

The New England Planters arrived at Boudreau's Bank on June 4, 1760 to settle the vacated Acadian lands, discovering 60 abandoned ox carts and yokes at the

landing used by the Acadians to take their belongings into exile.[1]The point was

intended as the main town settlement of the Cornwallis Township settlement, facing the Horton Township on the other side of the Cornwallis River. A town grid for Cornwallis with a parade ground was surveyed around the landing. However

settlers found that nearby Port Williams, Kentville and Canning made better town

sites, leaving the official town site at Starrs Point to develop instead as rich and

productive farmland. The original grid of streets of the Cornwallis town site is today

known as the Town Plot and is marked by a cairn commemorating the arrival of the

Planters.[2] The community became known as Starr's Point, after the Starr's family

who emerged as major landowners led by Major Samuel Starr one of the first

Planters settlers in the township.[3] One of the members of the Starr family, John

Starr, became an early Member of the Legislature for Kings County.

 

- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starr%27s_Point,_Nova_Scotia#cite_note-1

 

I would like to thank Gerald Gloade at the Mi’kmawey Debert Cultural Centre for his advice and for referring me to Pjila’si Mi’kma’ki - Mi’kmaw Place Name Digital Atlas http://sparc.smu.ca/mpnmap/

 

I would also like to sincerely thank Heritage Memorials in Windsor for their technical and material support of this project.

 

Installation
the truth is that if the sea did not cover these mines twice a day, and if they did not occur in rocks of such hardness, one might expect something therefrom
Directions 1. Hwy 101 exit 11
2. North onto Greenwich Conn
3. Right on Starr’s Point Rd
4. Right on Starr’s Point Loop
5. Park by the Planters Monument
6. Walk down the embankment and look for the stone on the right N 45° 06.112 W 064° 22.920 Installation is underwater 45 minutes on either side of high tide.